E-Letter - September 20, 2019

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Welcome to this weeks E-Letter
The E-Letter is published bi-weekly.

If anyone has feedback or items that they would like to see in the E- Letter, please contact Suzanne MacNeill: slmacneil@gov.pe.ca.

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS (click on the topic below to view the information)


GENERAL / TRAINING / EVENTS

Why evolving food preferences are showing more demand for protein
Shifting demographics and health considerations are broadening our palate for proteins and higher quality food. These trends matter for Canadian agriculture, in both the domestic and export markets.

An economic reality check for Canada’s farm sector
Many analysts predicted market uncertainty for 2019 and so far, those predictions have come true. With trade wars, mixed-result political dealings, and an overall unstable global economy, the situation for Canadian farmers continues to be concerning – though not inherently dire.

‘Slow-growth’ chicken soon to be on the shelf
Canadian researchers are determining what breeds of chickens would be best for slower-growth market

PEI Manure Nutrient Content Survey
The PEI Department of Agriculture and Land is looking for volunteer dairy and beef farms for their PEI Manure Nutrient Content survey. The goal of this survey is to update PEI's average manure nutrient content values for beef and dairy across PEI (poultry and swine to be sampled next year). Participating farms will have their manure piles or storages sampled twice in the upcoming year (once in spring and once in fall) and analyzed for nutrient content at the PEI Analytical Laboratories. Participating producers will be given their individual test results for free, as well as the averages for the whole province at the end of the project.
Farms will be chosen for the survey based on location and manure type requirements needed for the study. For more information, please contact Kyra Stiles at (902) 316-1600 or Melanie Bos at (902) 314-0790

Follow us on Twitter @AgInfoPEI
The PEI Department of Agriculture and Fisheries's Agriculture Information Twitter feeds will be your source for agriculture events and workshops on PEI. Tweet us today!

PEI Market Reports

AgWeather Atlantic Website

Food Matters blog Ian Petrie writes about agriculture on PEI.

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EVENTS
Commodity events are listed under their respective commodities.

October 17-18 - Forage PEI, Charlottetown

Calendar of Events

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TRAINING / JOBS

PEI AGRICULTURE SECTOR COUNCIL - EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Interested in working in agriculture? Are you looking to hire new employees?
To post your employment opportunity or for an up to date list of agricultural jobs in PEI, visit PEI Agriculture Sector Council job registry. Check back regularly as new positions are being posted frequently this time of year.

 

RENEW YOUR PESTICIDE CLASS A LICENSE
You can make an appointment to write the two hour exam by calling Thane Clarke at the Department of Communities, Land and Environment at (902) 368- 5599

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FARM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Written plans help build farm’s financial strength
uilding financial strength takes follow-through with made-to-measure plans, experts state. Once growers are engaged in determining where revenues go and gain education in making money grow, they need to execute the plans they’ve formed to meet the goals.

Agriwebinars

  • September 24 - Information Session: Introducing the National Farm Leadership Program - Kelly Dobson
  • October 17 -Farm Tax and Legal Update - various speakers

Market Prices

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BEEF

Culling requires a strategy
Backgrounding calves is especially important if they are weaned early. Earlier than normal weaning is one way producers can reduce feed needs for the cow herd.

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CEREALS/FORAGES/OILSEEDS

Researchers discover a way to eliminate almost all DON toxicity in corn
Now comes a revolutionary find by a research team with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), of a bacterium that can reduce and detoxify DON in various scenarios. According to Dr. Ting Zhou, a researcher with the Guelph Research and Development Centre, the discovery came during a search for new strategies to deal with mycotoxins, which have been identified as a growing global threat in corn and wheat production.

Finding alternative forage options to alfalfa
High alfalfa winterkill levels this spring led growers to consider other species to get enough feed

2019 Cereal Guide

2018 Roundup Ready Soybean Variety Trials

2018 Conventional Soybean Variety Trails

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DAIRY

Switchgrass can replace straw in dairy rations
However, researchers caution against feeding too much to lactating cows or milk production could drop

Robot milk is just as good
The adoption of automatic milking systems, or robots, on dairy farms across the country and the world has resulted in changes to cow comfort, management techniques, labor control, and producer lifestyles. But what about changes to our product — whole milk?

Atlantic Dairy Events Calendar

Dairy Quota Exchange

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DIRECT MARKETING / AGRI-TOURISM

Agri-Food Growth Program
The Prince Edward Island Department of Agriculture and Fisheries has established the Agri-Food Growth Program to build and enhance local markets to increase the awareness, sale and consumption of Prince Edward Island produced agri-food products.

Agri-Food Promotion Program
The Prince Edward Island Department of Agriculture and Fisheries has established the Agri-Food Promotion Program to increase the awareness, demand, and consumption for fresh, high- quality Prince Edward Island agricultural products.

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FORESTRY

PEI Woodlot Owner's Association website
PEIWOA is an inclusive group of woodlot owners that encourages Islanders to create a more sustainable forest ecosystem and forest resource on Prince Edward Island

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BEES

Abundant pollen, diversity found in pollinator-dependent crops
A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California, including California’s massive almond industry.

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FRUITS / BERRIES

New tender fruit varieties are just peachy
Harvest window, flavour and climate hardiness among most sought-after characteristics. An early ripening, yellow-flesh peach will be moving into first stage commercialization next year.

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HORSES

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ORGANIC/REDUCED INPUT

Switching to agricultural practices that call for less plowing can benefit the environment in the long run
Recent research published in the American Society of Agronomy evaluated the effect of changing agricultural methods to the water quality of a lake in southwestern Ohio. The study aimed to determine if switching cultivation methods could improve water quality. For a decade, researchers analyzed samples from Action Lake and measured the levels of suspended sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus.

September 22 - Organic Harvest Picnic, PEI Farm Centre
Tickets are now available for the PEI COPC’s largest annual fundraiser: the Organic Harvest Picnic. We invite our members, our supporters, and anyone who loves food, music, and games to join us on Sunday, September 22, at the Legacy Garden.

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POTATOES

Petunias as a Late Blight Defense? Not as Crazy as It Sounds
A common garden flower may contain the biological secrets needed to stop a fungus known for decimating potato and tomato crops. Research from associate professor Margot Becktell at Colorado Mesa University suggests that a naturally occurring sticky substance on petunia leaves can kill one of two types of spores produced by late blight.

PREVENTING BRUISE IN POTATOES
From general tips to variety-specific recommendations, these experts deliver the goods on mitigating bruise.

October 9 - SPUD SMART WEBINAR: THE INS AND OUTS OF POTATO YIELD MONITORS
With increased input costs and skyrocketing land prices, profit margins are shrinking — it’s never been more important to have a good handle on what’s happening in your fields. Data generated from yield maps provide insight on how to manage your crop to improve your profit margin, your yield, or both. Whether this is your first season or your fifth using a potato yield monitor, our guest speakers will make sure you’re getting the most out of the technology.

2018 Potato Guide - available on-line

2018 Seed Potato Certification List and Grower Directory available on- line

Terminal Market Potato Prices
These price data are compiled by USDA AMS Market News Service.

FOB Potato Prices
These price data are compiled by USDA AMS Market News Service.

Reports on Potato Supplies, Movement,Stocks, and Usage
This data are compiled by North American Potato Market News.

US National Potato & Onion Report


SHEEP/GOAT

Ontario Sheep Farmers explores feasibility of production insurance
anada’s sheep industry is full of opportunity, with strong demand and decent prices, but producer retention past the five-year mark has been identified as one of the challenges of growing the industry. Several factors play a role in new entrant and existing producer success, and Ontario Sheep Farmers (OSF) have focused on risk management program development as part of that success.

October 18 - 27thSheep Breeders' Lamb Dinner, Red Shores Racetrack, Charlottetown
Registration and payment deadline October 12. Please reserve tickets from Board of Director Members

PEI Sheep Breeders Website


SWINE

Mangalitsa pigs fill a specialty niche for farm
Mangalitsa (known as Mangalica in Hungarian) is a lard-type pig that was first bred in 1833. It is the only woolly pig in the world and also the fattiest one. Southern Alberta family raises the pigs for two years in their natural environment, where they eat an all-plant ration and are grass pastured


VEGETABLES/HERBS/OTHER

How Weather Influences Vegetable Insect Pests
Components of weather — mainly temperature, moisture, and wind — can either promote insect population growth or cause populations to decline. As we approach the hot and humid weather typical during the late summer and fall, growers can expect insect activity to increase. Why is that?

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COOL TOOLS

Hand-held technology allows farmers to identify plant diseases in the field
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed portable technology that allows farmers to identify plant diseases in the field. The handheld device, which is plugged into a smartphone, works by sampling the airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that plants release through their leaves.


FEEDBACK

We welcome your feedback. Suggestions, questions, or comments can be made to the Agriculture Information Desk at by e- mail to slmacneil@gov.pe.ca

Next E-Letter:   October 4, 2019

Date de publication : 
le 20 Septembre 2019
Agriculture et Terres

Renseignements généraux

Ministère de l'Agriculture et Terres
Immeuble Jones, 5e étage
11, rue Kent
C.P. 2000
Charlottetown (Î.-P.-É.) C1A 7N8

Téléphone : 902-368-4880
Télécopieur : 902-368-4857

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Service de renseignements agricoles
1-866-734-3276

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